Alyssa Milano and Breastfeeding Shaming

As if moms don’t have enough to worry about – we have a continued attack on public breastfeeding. This is a first world problem – a USA problem. Like so many other “issues,” those trying to build their ratings find something to project their biases and ignorance upon and try to get some controversy going. EVERYONE knows that if we were in a developing nation where Western marketing machinery had not yet ruined the culture and economy, breastfeeding in public would not even be a topic of conversation. Babies do not have any sense of propriety (as some would define it). They just know when they are uncomfortable and want their needs met. A young baby cannot understand that someone’s guilt might be stirred up by their need to be tended to in the same general vicinity as the casual observer.
The idea expressed in this commercial needs to be distributed.

If we are to help mothers reach recommended goals of breastfeeding to at least a year and hopefully to two, we must first help them reach their OWN goals – whatever that length might be! And currently, 80% of moms do NOT meet their own goals – whether to breastfeed 6 weeks or 2 years! Baby-Friendly Breastfeeding Initiatives and other similar programs are a first step to getting moms off right. But beyond that, the community must be engaged to support these moms. Breastfeeding should be welcome wherever it is safe for a mom and baby to be. Workplace and social accommodations must be championed. Ignorance can be cured with education. Disappointment when goals are not met must be met with determination to help the next mom – not try to downplay the goal!

If you are a friend or relative of a breastfeeding mom, do what you can to encourage and support her. Educate yourself and your community. The babies of the world will appreciate your efforts!

What to do till the lactation consultant gets there

Baby refusing the breast?
Milk supply low?
Baby not getting enough?

Remember these 3 things:
;
1. Feed the baby!
2. Protect your milk supply!
3. Make the breast a happy place!

Feed the baby.The amount a baby needs depends on his or her age and size. Babies between one to 6 months need around 24 ounces of breast milk per day. A 3 day old baby needs at least 4 oz per day, a 5 day old needs 8 oz, etc. A baby who is latching effectively may actually take more than these amounts from your breast. If your baby is under a week old and you believe he or she is not getting enough from direct breastfeeding, try offering small amounts of expressed breast milk by spoon, cup or finger-feeding with a syringe. If your baby is older and requires more than an ounce at a feeding, you may consider using paced bottle-feeding techniques for giving extra milk.

Protect your milk supply. Breast milk production is controlled by hormones in the beginning, but soon switches to local control. This means the more milk is removed from the breast, the more completely drained, the more it will produce in the next hour. When a baby is not effectively removing milk, this tells the breast that it is making too much. Using hand-expression and/or a rental-grade breast pump after feedings may be necessary to protect or build a supply until baby is able to empty the breast more easily. Research has shown that mothers who have effective breast drainage in the first three days (that is defined as 30 breastfeeds or hands-on pumping episodes in 72 hours) have twice as much milk at 10 days after delivery.

Make the breast a happy place. Keep baby skin to skin as much as possible. Baby should be between mom’s breasts, head facing to one side. Mom should be positioned comfortably, propped up with firm pillows with her back and arms supported. Breastfeeding is more than providing milk for your baby – it is setting up a relationship that starts out as meeting a physical need and transitions to meeting an emotional need between mother and child.

All breastfeeding techniques or assistive techniques should include these three concepts.